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Sexual Exploitation and Abuse

What Does Sexual Exploitation and Abuse Mean?

Sexual exploitation is any actual or attempted abuse of a position of vulnerability, differential power, or trust, for sexual purposes, including, but not limited to, profiting monetarily, socially or politically from the sexual exploitation of another.
Sexual abuse is the actual or threatened physical intrusion of a sexual nature, whether by force or under unequal or coercive conditions.
Example
A community health worker encourages young women to have sex with him in return for access to a training.
Example
A health worker demands sex from a person in return for medical treatment.

Why Should You Care About Sexual Exploitation and Abuse?

  • Sexual exploitation and abuse is devastating for the individuals involved and destroys relationships and trust within communities.
  • The Global Fund prohibits all forms of sexual exploitation and abuse in programs, including harassment and sexual activity with children.
  • Sexual exploitation and abuse is an unacceptable breach of the fundamental rights of people and a deep betrayal of our core values at the Global Fund.

How Do You Spot Sexual Exploitation and Abuse in Programs Supported by the Global Fund?

  • Look for circumstances where there is a power imbalance, particularly those involving beneficiaries (e.g., access to program benefits and during recruitment).

Report sexual exploitation and abuse

Anyone can report fraud and abuse to the Office of the Inspector General. Our anonymous reporting channels are designed to be:

Safe
Confidential
Easy

Report online in a simple form, available in English, French, Spanish and Russian

Email your allegation to hotline@theglobalfund.org

Some of the most common types of fraud and abuse are listed below. But this doesn’t cover everything. Learn more in "what to report."

  • Stealing money or medicine

  • Fake invoicing

  • Staging of fake training events

  • Counterfeiting drugs

  • Irregularities in tender processes

  • Bribery and kickbacks

  • Abuse of power or authority for personal gain

  • Conflict of interest

  • Personal use of assets

Please, make your report as specific and complete as possible using the following questions as a guide:

  • What is the type of wrongdoing you are reporting?

  • What happened exactly? Please provide details.

  • Where and when did it take place?

  • Who was involved? Please share full name, title, and office.

  • How did you become aware of this wrongdoing? Did you witness it?

  • Do you have evidence of this wrongdoing? (Please provide any evidence that you have) Do you know if evidence exists? How do you know, and where can we find it?

  • Who else knows? Can we contact them? (Please provide their contact details)

  • Why do you think it should be investigated?

  • Do you have any other relevant information?

The Office of the Inspector General (OIG) guarantees protection of your identity. If you make a report in good faith, no retaliation will be tolerated. You can remain anonymous regardless of how you choose to report fraud or abuse. Please note, however, that if the OIG cannot contact you for further information or for clarification, it can sometimes make it difficult to investigate your report further.

If you want to remain anonymous, you may use the online form to report your claim. When you complete the online form, you will receive a personal identification number that will allow you to check for updates while at the same enabling the Global Fund to ask follow-up questions. All online submissions are managed by an independent company, which does not turn over your personal information to the OIG.

If you do provide your personal details when making a report, the OIG will not disclose them unless you give your explicit consent.

As soon as possible. Grant recipients are obligated to inform the Office of the Inspector General of all allegations of fraud and abuse as soon as it is known.

Staff at the Office of the Inspector General (OIG) will screen your report to determine the most appropriate action. This could lead to an investigation by OIG staff or a referral to national authorities. Alternatively, where appropriate, the matter may be referred to other areas of the Global Fund for action.